September 20, 2015 - September 21, 2015

An Interdisciplinary International Conference
Cardozo School of Law, 55 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003

Co-Organized By:

The Floersheimer Center for Constitutional Democracy and The Program on Global and Comparative Constitutional Theory at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law;
The Judging Faith Project at UC Berkeley;
And
International Network of Civil Liberties Organizations (INCLO)

The question to what extent religious beliefs should be accommodated in liberal, secular democratic societies that are increasingly multicultural and multi-religious, has become a paramount one. Traditionally, the practice of conscientious objection arose in the context of individuals refusing to bear arms in a military conflict or to serve in the armed forces, and was rooted in the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion as protected by national, international and regional human rights law. Under the current predicament, however, the claimed space for religious exceptions has become much wider and diverse, as the right to religious objection is most frequently invoked in conflicts implicating abortion, assisted reproduction techniques, contraception, LGBT equality, and same-sex marriage. Moreover, while traditional invocations of conscientious objection were aimed at protecting minority views (such as pacifism) and minority religious practices, today religious exceptions are often invoked in the name of traditional religious views to thwart the implementation of laws intended to advance the equality of marginalized groups and of minorities, (e.g. refusals to serve others on the ground of their sexual orientation).

This conference will address the new challenges of conscientious objection from both theoretical and different legal perspectives. Questions to be examined include the following: Liberal philosophers, such as Dworkin and Rawls, have stressed the importance of conscience objection to the point of defending a right to civil disobedience under certain circumstances, in cases in which law impinges on fundamental freedoms. But in a pluralistic polity, where individuals and groups hold irreconcilable convictions, what are the criteria to determine what exemptions from generally applicable law—if any-- should be granted on the basis of a genuine assertion of conscientious objection?  Is a ‘general right to conscientious objection’, which would exempt religious individuals and/or corporate entities under the latter’s control   from all anti-discrimination and other rules interfering with manifestations of their beliefs, consistent with a secular, pluralistic democracy? Does the focus on rights obscure other more desirable pathways to accommodation and resolution of conflicts between the conscientious objector and those adversarely affected by the latter’s action? What is the role of courts in adjudicating religious exception claims by religious majorities? Should claims of religious majorities be treated differently than those of religious minorities and left to the ordinary democratic processs? Is there a difference if such claims are expressed in the language of constitutional law rather than in that of human rights law? To what extent are claims of religious exceptions constitutive of political identities?

 

Panels:

I.                  The Changing Discourse of Religious Liberty Claims: Conscientous Objection or Culture Wars?

Reva Siegel (Nicholas deB. Katzenbach Professor of Law at Yale Law School)

Douglas NeJaime(Professor of Law & Faculty Director of the Williams Institute at UCLA Law School)

Susanna Mancini (Professor of Law at University of Bologna School of Law; Adjunct Professor of International Law at Johns Hopkins University SAIS Europe)

Shai Lavi (Professor of Law at Tel Aviv University Law School)

Pasquale Annichino (Research Fellow at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies at European Univeristy Institute)

Renata Uitz (Professor of Comparative Constitutional Law at Central European University)

Judge Nancy Gertner (Former United States Federal Judge for the District of Massachusetts)

 

   II.            Objecting to Anti-Discrimination Laws in the Name of Religious Majorities: Striking a Balance between Freedom and Equality

Christopher McCrudden (William W. Cook Global Law Profesor at Michigan Law; Professor of Human Rights and Equality Law at Queens Unversity Belfast)

Robert Post (Dean and Sol & Lillian Goldman Professor of Law at Yale Law School)

Eva Brems (Professor at the Human Rights Center, Ghent University)

Helen Keller (Judge at the European Court of Human Rights)

Marci Hamilton (Paul R. Verkuil Chair of Public Law at Cardozo Law School)

Michael McConnell (Director of the Constitutional Law Center at Stanford Law School)

Isabelle Rorive (Professor of Law at the Universite Libre de Bruxelles)

Louise Melling (Deputy Legal Director and Director of Center for Liberty, American Civil Liberties Union)

David Oppenheimer (Clinical Professor of Law of Berkleley Law)

 

III.            Conscientious Objection in a Constitutional Democracy: Theoretical Perspectives

Michel Rosenfeld (University Professor of Law and Comparative Democracy; Justice Sydney L. Robins Professor of Human Rights; Director, Program on Global and Comparative Constitutional Theory at Cardozo Law School)

Cecile Laborde (Professor of Political Theory at University College London)

Lorenzo Zucca (Dickson Poon School of Law at King's College London)

Bernard Schlink (Professor Emeritus at Humboldt University Berlin)

Micah Swartzman (Edward F. Howrey Professor of Law at University of Virginia School of Law)

Nelson Tebbe (Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School)

Marinos Diamantides (Reader in Law at Birkbeck, University of London)

Christopher Kutz (C. William Maxeiner Distinguished Professor of Law at Berkeley Law)

Eric Beerbohm (Professor of Government at Harvard University; Director of Graduate Fellowships at the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics)

 

IV.            Religion, Identity and Equality: Transnational Perspectives of Civil Liberties Advocates

Dorothy Samuels (Senior Fellow, Brennan Center at NYU School of Law)

Brigitte Amiri (Senior Staff at ACLU's Reproductive Freedom Project)

Noa Mendelsohn Aviv (Director, Equality Program at Canadian Civil Liberties Association)

Rosie Brihouse (Legal Officer at Liberty)

Stephen O’Hare (Senior Research and Policy Programme Manager at Irish Council for Civil Liberties)

 

 

 

 

Tentative Conference Schedule

 

Sunday, September 20, 2015

Greetings: 10 AM

Panel I (Part 1)   10:10-11:40 AM

  Coffee Break   11:40-12:00 PM

Panel I (Part 2) 12:00-1:15 PM

Lunch 1:15-2:30 PM

Panel II (Part 1): 2:30-4:00 PM

Coffee Break 4:00-4:30 PM

Panel II (Part 2) 4:30-5:45 PM

Conference Dinner 7:30 PM

 

Monday, September 21, 2015

 

Panel III (Part 1) 10:30AM-12:00 PM

Lunch 12:15-1:45 PM

Panel III (Part 2) 1:45-3:00PM

Coffee Break/Reception: 3:00 PM

Panel IV 6:00-7:30 PM

Closing Reception 7:30 PM

February 6, 2015

Ten years ago, Syriza obtained just 4% of the vote in Greek elections. Recently, the leftwing party took control of the country under the charismatic leadership of Alexis Tsipras. Tsipra’s impressive election victory and his decision to build an anti-austerity government in coalition with the rightwing populist Independent Greeks Party sent shockwaves through Europe. What impact is to be expected for Greece and for Europe in general? Can this government keep Greece in the EURO-Zone and does it really want to? How will it deal with the social challenges Greece is facing? Will the success of Syriza galvanize the extreme left all over Europe and put pressure on the EU economic policies? And what to think of the fact that the Russian ambassador to Greece was the first foreign diplomat welcomed by Prime Minister Tsipras? Will the new Greek government be committed to NATO and the EU foreign policy?

These and other questions will be discussed in a Rapid Response Debate with three experts:

Gérard Roland is E. Morris Cox Professor of Economics and Professor of Political Science. He is a leading expert on questions dealing with the EU economy and EU politics.

Christos H. Papadimitriou is C. Lester Hogan Professor of EECS. He is a native from Greece and well informed on the complexities of Greek politics and society.

Eleftherios Mikros is an LL.M. Candidate at the UC Berkeley School of Law. He is a native of Greece and expert on social issues like immigration, education and human rights in Greece.

The debate will be moderated by Jeroen Dewulf, Director of Berkeley’s Institute of European Studies.

It will take place on February 6 from noon to 1:30 PM at 223 Moses Hall and is co-organized by the Institute of European Studies and the Center on Institutions and Governance at the Institute of International Studies.

February 4, 2015
Panel Discussion
Robert Alter, Founding Director, Center for Jewish Studies 
Hatem Bazian, Department of Near Eastern Studies
Jeroen Dewulf, Director, Institute of European Studies
Marion Fourcade, Department of Sociology
Saba Mahmood, Department of Anthropology
Edward Wasserman, Dean of Graduate School of Journalism

Moderator: Tyler Stovall, Department of History

A panel of prominent Berkeley faculty will meet to start a dialogue on the shooting rampage in Paris. They will discuss topics such as free speech, antisemitism, hate speech, freedom of religion and islamophobia.
 
June 30, 2014 - July 2, 2014

The 7th China Economics Summer Institute (CESI) will take place at Tsinghua University School of Economics and Managment between June 30 and July 2nd 2014. The program can be downloaded here. The working papers of previous CESI workshops available at http://igov.berkeley.edu/china_workingpapers and at http://chinasummerinstitute.org.

The objective of CESI is to create a network and community of top level scholars working on Chinese economic development. This initiative is currently co-sponsored by UC Berkeley IGov - Institutions and Governance Program at the Institute for International Studies (with generous funding from the Ford Foundation), the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, the School of Economics and Management at Tsinghua University, the Guanghua School of Management at Peking University, the Institute for Emerging Market Studies at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and a joint program of the LICOS-Center for Institutions and Economic Performance at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and Stanford - CASS REAP (Rural Education Action Program). The Summer Institute is organized in collaboration with the BREAD, NBER and CEPR networks of academic economists. 

The Summer Institute will bring together between 20 and 30 participants for a period of three days.  During the workshop, there will be seminar presentations and free time to allow scholars to interact and explore the possibility of doing joint research projects. Senior scholars who will attend will be available for consultations with junior scholars. Afternoon sessions will give the opportunity to a select group of young scholars and Ph. D students to present their work.

The scientific committee of the China Economic Summer Institute is composed of Chongen Bai, Robin Burgess, Hongbin Cai, Chang-Tai Hsieh, Hongbin Li, Albert Park, Gérard Roland, Jo Swinnen, Shang-Jin Wei and Yaohui Zhao.

September 20, 2013 - September 21, 2013

How American and European courts confront the problem of reconciling secular democratic principles with increasingly assertive faith identities?

The aim of the workshop is to bring together a small group of distinguished judges, scholars and advocates to discuss the tensions between faith-based practices and secular ideals.

One of the most salient features of the new millennium is the assertiveness of religious faith in current and former secular states.  Nations and states are struggling to accommodate the claims of citizens who increasingly insist that their religious faith forms part of their public identities, and not merely their private consciences. The clash between faith-based practices and secular ideals has revolved centrally around issues of religious doctrine and symbols in public education, claims of bodily integrity and genital cutting, sexual equality versus gendered roles, animal rights and ritual butchering practices.  A new twist, however, to these conflicts, has been the deployment of religious liberty claims as speaking to the standing of communities in relation to the state, as opposed to the traditional frame of an individual right of conscience.

There are no easy practical or theoretical resolutions to these conflicts, given citizens’ firm anchors in faith, and Western (and Mediterranean) anchors in secularism.  While the tensions have been well explored in a burgeoning literature in the social sciences, their treatment in law has necessarily remained theoretically underdeveloped, since they are addressed case-by-case by judges.  Our goal is that initiating a series of conversations that cut both across disciplines, and within and without the courtroom will enrich both legal decision making and scholarship.

This increasing role of the state and the courts on religious issues presents an extraordinary opportunity for discussions among scholars, judges and policymakers in both North America and Europe.  The moment is extraordinary because it reflects a shared and urgent topic that has been addressed on each side of the Atlantic. It represents, moreover, a wonderful opportunity for American judges and policy makers to learn lessons from Europe, where religion-based clashes with the ideals of the state have been more present, or at least more visible, than in the US.  At the same time, the rich American jurisprudence of social equality, a product of its history of slavery, can contribute to European and African understandings of the needs of minority faiths.

The workshop will consist of several seminar-style discussions over 1.5 days, ending Saturday September 21th by noon. See program as attached

On invitation only: please contact hriss@berkeley.edu.

The workshop is jointly sponsored by  IIS-Center on Institutions and Governance, the Law School’s Kadish Center for Morality, Law and Public Affairs, the Robbins Collection, theReliogWest project of the Robert Schuman Center in Florence, the Institute of Governmental Studies, the IGS Anglo-American Studies program and  the" Politics of Religious Freedom Contested Norms and Local Practices project". 

 

 

The last session of the workshop on Saturday 20th from 11:00 to 12 will be open to the public

August 22, 2013 - August 24, 2013
The 6th China Economics Summer Institute (CESI) will take place on August 22-24, 2013 at at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
 
The objective of CESI is to create a network and community of top level scholars working on Chinese economic development. This initiative is currently co-sponsored by UC Berkeley Center on Institutions and Governance (with generous funding from the Ford Foundation), the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, the School of Economics and Management at Tsinghua University, the Guanghua School of Management at Peking University, The Hong Kong University of science and Technology and a joint program of the LICOS-Center for Institutions and Economic Performance at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and Stanford- CASS REAP (Rural Education Action Program). The Summer Institute is organized in collaboration with the BREAD, NBER and CEPR networks of academic economists."
 
(Working papers for the 2012 and previous CESI workshops available at http://igov.berkeley.edu/china_workingpapers and at http://chinasummerinstitute.org ).
March 5, 2013

The results of the Italian elections have shaken financial markets all over the world.  As one of the largest economies in Europe, the Italian political system's deadlock threatens the Eurozone and the European Union.  Marco Leonardi is a Labor Economist at the University of Milan and an adviser of the Partito Democratico in Italy.  He will present his insights on the results of the Italian election and his proposals for how to make Italy more governable

June 22, 2012 - June 24, 2012
The 5th China Economics Summer Institute (CESI) will take place on June 22-24, 2012 at Guanghua New Building, Peking University.
 
The objective of CESI is to create a network and community of top level scholars working on Chinese economic development. This initiative is currently co-sponsored by UC Berkeley Center on Institutions and Governance (with generous funding from the Ford Foundation), the Initiative on Global Markets at Chicago Booth, the School of Economics and Management at Tsinghua University, the Guanghua School of Management at Peking University and a joint program of the LICOS-Center for Institutions and Economic Performance at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and Stanford- CASS REAP (Rural Education Action Program). The Summer Institute is organized in collaboration with the BREAD, NBER and CEPR networks of academic economists."
 
For the 2012 program click here
 
(Working papers for the 2012 and previous CESI workshops available at http://igov.berkeley.edu/china_workingpapers and at http://chinasummerinstitute.org ).
 
If you need further information, please do not hesitate to contact me.
 
Yours sincerely,
 
Heddy, Riss
Program Director
UC Berkeley iGov- Institutions and Governance Program, Institute of International Studies 
Email: igovcesi2012@berkeley.edu
http://igov.berkeley.edu
AttachmentSize
2012CESI Program10 KB
July 1, 2011 - July 3, 2011

 

China Economics Summer Institute 2011

Conference Agenda

 

Conference VenueRoom 501, Weilun BLD, Tsinghua University

 

Friday, July 1:

1:30 - 1:45:     Welcome by Professor Bai Chong-En or Dean Qian Yingyi.

 

1:45 - 2:45:    International Mobility and Institutional Change.

Noam Yuchtman (University of California, Berkeley) and Suresh Naidu (Columbia University).

 

2:45 - 3:00:  Coffee Break

 

3:00 - 4:00:    How Intergenerational Status Transmission Affects Marital Sorting:

Evidence from China.   Zhao Yaohui (Peking University) and Li Han (Hong Kong University).

 

4:00 - 4:15:   Coffee Break

 

4:15 - 5:15:  China's Educational Inequality: Evidence from College Entrance Exams and Admissions.  Li Hong-Bin (Tsinghua University)

 

5:15 - 5:30:  Coffee Break

 

5:30 - 6:30:  Provincial and Local Governments in China -- Fiscal Institutions and Government Behavior.   Roger Gordon (University of California, San Diego) and Li Wei (Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business).

 

7:00:  Dinner (Quan Ju De)

 

Saturday, July 2:

 

9:00 - 10:00:  What is Different About New Exports? Productivity, Factor Intensity, and Product Switching.  Yu Ma, Heiwai Tang (Tufts University) and Yifan Zhang(Lingnan University)

 

10:00 - 10:15:  Coffee Break

 

10:15 - 11:15:   AStructural Estimation of Distortions in UK And Chinese Manufacturing Firms.  Laura Wu (Nanyang Technological University) and Song Zheng (Chinese University of Hong Kong).

 

11:15 - 11:45:  Coffee Break

 

11:45 - 12:45:  Trade Liberalization and Embedded Institutional Reform:  Evidence from Chinese Exporters.  Amit Khandewal (Columbia Business School), Peter Schott (Yale School of Management), Shang-Jin Wei (Columbia Business School).

 

1:00:  Lunch (Box  Lunch )

 

Sunday, July 3

9:00 - 10:00:   The Role of Elected and Appointed Village Leaders in the Allocation of Public Resources – Evidence from a Low-Income Region in China.  Mu Ren (Texas A&M University) and Zhang Xiaobo (International Food Policy Research Institute).

 

10:00 - 10:15:  Coffee Break

 

10:15 - 11:15:   Do Girls in China Compete Just as much as Boys? Evidence from an Experiment that Predicts Educational Choice.  Jane Zhang (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology).

 

11:15 - 11:45:  Coffee Break

 

11:45 - 12:45:  Patient Knowledge and Antibiotic Abuse.  Lin Wanchuan (Peking University), Janet Currie (Columbia University), and Wei Zhang (China Europe International Business School).

 

1:00 Lunch (Box Lunch)

 

Adjourn.

June 16, 2011 - July 16, 2011

After successful conferences in Brussels, Belgium and Berkeley, CA,  the  Atlantic (‘Bloomsday’) EnergyEfficiency Conference will take place in Paris,  France on June 16-17 2011 at the International Energy Agency (IEA), Paris, 9, rue de la Fédération75739 Paris Cedex 15

This project has been funded by the European Union within the framework of the Pilot Project on Transatlantic Methods for Handling Global Challenges (http://igov.berkeley.edu/trans/).

The Atlantic Energy Efficiency Project is a partnership led by University College, Dublin with collaborators Center on Institutions and Governance at the University of California Berkeley, the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS) Brussels, and the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI). It is funded by the European External Action Service (EEAS) and SEAI.

The objective of the project is to identify lessons from Europe, the US and Asia as to what should be the priorities to realise the optimum potential of energy efficiency to advance the economy, reduce dependence  on energy imports, limit green house gas and air pollution  emissions, and increase comfort levels

May 6, 2011 - May 7, 2011

Click Here to Download Full Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Location:
UC Berkeley, May 6-7th, 2011
Great Hall, Bancroft Hotel
2680 Bancroft Way, Berkeley (near Café Strada)

Friday May 6 th, 2011
8:30-8:45 AM: Opening Remarks: Heddy Riss, Olivier Roy, David Lieberman.
8:45-10:15: Religious Norms and Public Spheres: The Challenge     
Chair: David Lieberman
Olivier Roy: “Muslim Democrats vs. European Populists”
Silvio Ferrari: “A European Perspective”
Peter Danchin: “Islam in the Secular Nomos of the European Court of Human Rights"

10:15-10:30:  Break

10:30-12:00: The Debate of Islamic Norms in Arab Countries
Chair: Hatem Bazian
Enrique Klaus: “Scandals in Egypt and the Manufacturing of Religious Norms in the Public Spheres”
Belkacem Benzenine: “The Challenge of Secularism in the Political and Religious Spheres in the Arab World”

Discussant: Charles Hirschkind
 

12:00-1:00 PM: Lunch

The Debate on Religious Norms in the Public Sphere

1:00-3:30: The Case of European Countries
Chair: Leti Volpp
Poland
Geneviève Zubrzycki: “Debating the Place of Religious Symbols in the Public Sphere in Poland, 1989 2010”
UK
Matthew Francis: “Return? It never left. Exploring the ‘sacred’ as a Resource for Bridging the Gap Between the Religious and the Secular”
France
Valérie Amiraux: “Burka Bashing in the European Union: the Racialization of Muslims”
Romain Sèze: “Standardization of the Exercise of the Islamic Religious Authority in France”
Christian Joppke: “Limits of Restricting Islam: The French Burqa Law of 2010”
Discussants:    Prof. Sarah Song, Berkeley Law

3:30-3:45: Break

3:45-4:45: North American Countries Cases
Chair: Ron Hassner
USA
Pasquale Annicchino: “Mosques Controversies in the U.S.: Emotions, Politics and the Right to Religious Freedom”
Canada:
David Koussens: “Catholic Rituals and Symbols in Government Institutions: Juridical Arrangements, Political Debates and Secular Issues in Quebec”
Discussant: Sr. Marianne Farina

4:45-5:45: Asian Countries Cases
Chair: Pradeep Chhibber
Sophie Lemière: “Cracks in the Mosaic: The Rise of Right-Wing Ethno-Religious Groups in Malaysia”
Marco Ventura: "You Shall Go to Hell: Legal Arguments on Forced Conversions Before the Supreme Court of India"
Discussant: Nargis Virani

5:45-6:45 PM: Keynote Lecture
Ebrahim Moosa “Norms in the Madrasa-Sphere: Between Tradition, Scripture and the Public Good”
 

Saturday May 7th 2011

9:00-10:30 Conclusions Panel: "How to face the Challenge of Religious Norms and the Public Sphere?"

Olivier Roy
Naomi Seidman
Ebrahim Moosa
Marianne Farina
Imam Faheem Shuaibe
 

10:30-10:45: Break

10:30-12:00: Partner University Fund's "Transatlantic Network of Scholars on Muslims' Religiouus Identity, Secularism, Democracy, and Citizenship" Presentations

Chair: Mahan Mirza

Elise Massicard: “When heterodoxy Challenges the Public Place of Religion: The Case of Alevism in Turkey

Munir Jiwa: “E Pluribus Umma: Secularism and the Mediation of Islamic Norms

Soraya Tlatli: “The Separation of Cult and State in Colonial Algeria.

 

12:00-1:00 PM: Lunch

13:00-4:00 PM: PUF Presentations Cont.
Jo Gardner: "Religious Nationalism and the Westphalian State”
Alexander Rosas: “Diversification of the Republic: Cultural Diversity in Contemporary France”
Sheherazade Kahil: “Institutionalization in France of the pilgrimage to Mecca”
Mary Hoopes: “Asylum Claims Before the Federal Courts of Appeals: Considering the Role of Religion”
Akasemi Newsome: “Immigrants Before German Administrative Courts: Do Islam and Gender Matter for the Application of Foreign Legal Regimes in Germany?”
Zehra Sahin: “The Diyanet -Program of International Theology: Adjustment to Western Norms or Aggiornamento from Inside?”
 

February 11, 2011 - February 12, 2011

 

ATLANTIC ENERGY EFFICIENCY

(http://www.transatlanticenergyefficiency.eu)

 

 

Goldberg Room, 297 Simon Hall
UC Berkeley School of Law,

Berkeley, California 94720

The project is directed by the Earth Sciences Institute, University College Dublin (Frank J 
Convery, Director) in partnership with the Centre on Institutions and Governance and the Law School, University of California Berkeley  (Michael Hanemann), the Centre for European Policy Studies (Christian Egenhofer) and the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (Owen Lewis), guided by a steering committee which includes the International Energy Agency (Lisa Ryan) and the Association for the Conservation of Energy (Andrew Warren).

The Workshop

This workshop will cover energy efficiency strategy in China; energy efficiency strategy in India; energy efficiency strategy in Japan; crosscutting lessons from these countries; funding mechanisms for energy efficiency; and the energy efficiency dimensions of economic stimulus packages.A key objective for the workshop will be to get feedback with a view to improving the quality of the final output.

Structure and Audience

For each area, an anchor paper will be presented. It will be followed by feedback from the panellists and their own thinking on the topic,followed in turn by input from the workshop participants.

This event will be of particular interest to those who have a role in shaping and implementing policy as regards energy efficiency, where policy embraces tax and related incentives (positive and negative), regulation, information, subsidies and research and development. 

Next Stage

Following this workshop, the papers will be revised and made available on the website http://www.transatlanticenergyefficiency.eu

A wrap up conference will take place in Europe at the end of the project (end May 2011)



[1]     The Atlantic Energy Efficiency Project[1] is funded by the European Commission and co-funded by

the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland. This is one of the seven projects funded under

the Pilot Project ‘Transatlantic Methods for Handling Global Challenges in the European Union and

the United States’. Its primary objective is to develop mutual understanding about plans and performance

in regard to energy efficiency in Europe and the US, and the opportunities for mutual learning and shared initiatives.

A second objective is to relate these insights to global developments, and in particular in regard to developments

in China, India and Japan.

 

December 16, 2010 - December 17, 2010

The Religious Norms in the Public Sphere workshop in Florence, Italy took place from December 16 to December 17 and was co-hosted by iGov.

For the workshop schedule click here: program 

From the ban of minarets in Switzerland, to the question of crucifixes in public schools in Italy, to the English High Court ruling on Jewish identity in the case of admission to an orthodox Jewish high school: the sacred has emerged into secular democratic politics.

This “return to the sacred” encompasses both a re-emergence of religious norms and ideas into public sphere and, as a result of globalization, an increasing disconnect between religious norms and regional cultural markers.

In our post-9/11 world, the media has focused on ‘newly’ discovered Muslim populations in the West, often casting this religious group in ethnic terms. This has led Western governments to use problematic tools and lenses - assimilation, secularization, and multiculturalism - to deal with religious “minorities’” role in the public sphere. These are problematic because they mistake the relation of religion to culture and politics within pluralistic states.

The RPS network, anchored by U.C. - Berkeley and the Robert Schuman Center of the European University Institute (EIU), aims to shed new light on these issues by recasting the supposed tensions between Islam and the West in light of broader questions about religion’s relationship to modern politics and society.  The RPS international scholarly network will analyze the call by people of all faiths for greater recognition of religious norms by governments, legislatures, and schools.

The research will have clear relevance for public policy on both sides of the Atlantic by directly addressing how political demands and religious identities can be respected while still complying with the secular principles underlying Western democratic traditions.

The RPS will work on the following issues among others:

  • Are there common patterns for integrating the personal practice of religion into public life?
  • Who are the actors in this integration and what impact do they have on public policies?
  • What do we mean by the term “Public Religion?” Is it a theological reform or just a recasting of religiosity?
  • How are the changes taking place in Western societies reflected in other traditionally religious societies?
  • How should we think of religion in the public sphere, in a secularized and pluralist environment?
  • How do Western courts or administrative decisions (e.g., appointing Religious chaplains) contribute to shape the notion of “Western Religion?”
  • How do national norms of citizenship and national norms regarding the relationship between religion and the state shape the adoption of different approaches to this issue?
  • How is the integration of religion into public life understood differently across national contexts? Is this understood as a matter of liberty? Of equality? Of some other norm?
  • What is the relationship between religion and culture? How does this relationship vary across the major religious traditions? What is distinctive about religion as a discourse of identity?

RPS has been made possible thanks to the support of the Partner University Fund, the Carnegie Foundation and the Social Science Research Council.

PROGRAM

For more information please visit: rps.berkeley.edu

September 23, 2010 - September 24, 2010

The first workshop took place in Brussels on September 23- 24, 2010 on the Analysis of EU and sub EU and US and sub US roadmaps for energy efficiency, presentation of other successful experience.

For the program click here: program.

 

This workshop presented the first wave of findings of the project in regard to energy efficiency plans
and performance
 
Overall – a global overview, and transport
The European Union overall, and in two case study member states
The US overall, and in two case-study States
 
The emphasis was on lessons learned, on what has worked, what can be learned from what has not
worked, and what direction policy should take in the future in order to maximise progress. Performance will include collateral benefits, such as reduced air pollution.
 
A key objective for the workshop was to get feedback with a view to improving the quality of the
final output.

It is a joint project of UC Berkeley' s iGov-Institutions and Governance Program with the Earth System Institute, University College, Dublin - Sustainable Energy Ireland - Centre for European Study Policy Studies (Brussels).

The project is funded by the European Commission (DG External Relations) within the framework of the pilot-program on Transatlantic Methods for Handling Global Challenges.

 

For More information Please Visit: Transatlantic Energy Efficiency

July 2, 2010 - July 5, 2010

The third China Economics Summer Institute has taken place at Tsinghua University on July 2 through July 5, 2010 (program available here) The objective of CESI is to create a network and community of top level scholars working on Chinese economic development. This initiative has been made possible thanks to a grant of the Ford Foundation. It  is co-sponsored by UC Berkeley, the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, the LICOS-Center for Institutions and Economic Performance at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Hong Kong University, and theSchool of Economics and Management at Tsinghua University.

December 10, 2009 - December 12, 2009

 

iGov- the Institutions and Governance program – in association with the Mediterranean Program of the Robert Schuman Center for advanced studies  (RSCAS)  has organized, an international, interdisciplinary meeting for scholars exploring the issue of religious norms in the public sphere (RPS) under the supervision of Prof. Olivier Roy. 

This workshop took place in Florence on December 10-12, 2009.

For the workshop's program: program

 

The issue of religious norms in the public sphere has most recently arisen in the context of polemical attacks related to Muslims (regarding the veil, the Danish cartoons, and the issue of apostasy), and has led to a debate over the compatibility of Islam with so-called “western norms” also referred to as “modern” and “secular.”The conference has started with the questions that have arisen around Islamic Norms in the Public Sphere and has compared the results with other religious norms.

 

As far as Islam is concerned, the questions of whether and how religious norms should be integrated into public life have arisen recently in the context of Muslim communities in the West.  Factors such as the failure of political Islam, globalization, and the establishment of Muslim populations in the West result in three new potential paradigms for Islamic norms in the public sphere:

1. Integrating or reframing Sharia into a modern State law system.

2. Recasting Islamic norms as cultural norms for an ethno-cultural community, either a national community or as a minority population.

3. Interpreting Islamic norms as moral or ethical norms of a purely religious faith community, based on an individual and private choice.

 

But the same questions are also relevant for traditional Muslim societies with Muslim populations are grappling with how to apply these paradigms to their existing political and social systems.  For example, in Muslim societies, the issue of building a “church” (e.g., the dyanet in Turkey, official muftyat elsewhere), the transformation of Sharia into state law, the de facto secularization of civil societies (e.g., in Iran), the growing trend towards individualism and spiritualization of faith, despite the strength of communal bonds, and the questioning of the taboo on apostasy (e.g., conversions to Christianity in Morocco), all contribute to a vital debate on the appropriate role for Islamic norms in the public sphere.

 

Meanwhile in Western societies, reactions to Islamic norms that are beginning to appear in the public sphere might include:

1.Multiculturalism: Islamic norms represent the fundamental expression of an ethno-cultural minority identity, for which state action such as the establishment of an arbitration court or the passage of targeted legislation would be appropriate e.g. the call to establish an Islamic arbitration court in Ontario following the model of the rabbinic court, the declaration of Dr Rowan Williams, Archbishop of Canterbury, about the possibility of recognizing non-Christian courts (ie sharia courts) to decide certain matters of family law.

2. The “Church” model: Muslims are treated as any other community of faith in that society—u this has been the predominant U.S. approach

3. Individual or “citizen” model (e.g., French laïcité):  Islamic norms are viewed as an individual set of values which should be kept strictly in the private sphere. A well-publicized example of this debate is the ban on public religious displays in public schools in France

 

The Network on Islamic and Religious Norms in the Public Sphere (RPS) has explored these paradigms in different contexts.

It has brought together experts stemming from different disciplinary backgrounds such as political science, sociology, economics, law and religious studies. It has given priority to leading scholars who approach their scholarship from a comparative and empirical perspective. The aim is to think in an innovative way, avoiding culturalist debates, and focusing instead on the concrete ways individuals and groups are experiencing answers and conflicts.

December 1, 2009

A series of panel presentations on financial and economic turmoil have been organized: These programs were webcast and recorded. Global Financial Market Turmoil, October 2, 2008 Good Bank Bad Bank, February 18, 2009 Global Financial & Economic Crisis: What Should the G20 do? March 18, 2009 Global Unemployement, October 28th, 2009 Business and Ethics, December 1st 2009 Those events are co sponsored by the Berkeley Center for Law, Business and the Economy

August 19, 2009

Where is Climate Change Headed in Europe?
What May Be Accomplished in Copenhagen?

Presentation by Frank Convery 

Heritage Trust Professor of Environmental Policy at University College, Dublin. He is an adviser on climate change policy to the EU Commission and the Japanese Government Cabinet Office. 
Power Point presentation available click here 

Co-sponsored by the Climate and Energy Policy Institute of Berkeley Law 

June 27, 2009 - July 1, 2009
China Summer<br />
Economics Institute

The China Economics Summer Institute took place again in 2009 after a first successful meeting (Working papers available here) . The objective of the China Summer Economics Institute is to create a network and community of top level scholars working on Chinese economic development. This initiative is co-sponsored by UC Berkeley, the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, the LICOS-Center for Institutions and Economic Performance at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Hong Kong University and the School of Economics and Management at Tsinghua University. The Summer Institute was organized in collaboration with the BREAD, NBER and CEPR networks of academic economists.

Click here for the papers that were presented

The past program is available here.

June 10, 2009

Webcast of the conference in Washington:
Youtube Part 1Part 2Part 3 or UCB Webcast Part 1Part 2Part 3

Next conference June 10th, 2009 at the Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Science and the Arts

California-EU Regulatory Cooperation
Project

The IGS-UC Berkeley Center on Institutions and Governance (http://igov.berkeley.edu) and the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies and LICOS (University of Leuven) will be holding a conference on June 10th at the Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Science and the Arts, Hertogsstraat 1 1000 Brussels.

This conference is the culmination of a two-year project "Managing Biosafety and biodiversity in a global world-EU, US, California and Comparative perspectives". The preliminary conference program may be accessed at the project web site.
The goal of the project is to examine the roles that California and the European Union play in defining the forefront of domestic and international environmental policy solutions and to produce concrete, actionable policy recommendations to further regulatory cooperation between the EU, California and the US on transatlantic environmental issues, including climate change, chemicals policy, biosafety, water regulation, and biodiversity protection.
As socioeconomic and environmental issues become increasingly integrated, innovative policy solutions are required to identify and address the complex nexus between society and environment. The project has developed a network of representatives from the US and the EU in academia, industry, the NGO-sector, and government.
A first conference has taken place in Washington on April 30th, 2009. 
Click here for the program
Click here for the papers that have been discussed.
Click here for the presentation

May 7, 2009 - May 8, 2009


Political Problems, Legal Issues and Social Practices

Webcast available: Youtube webcast.berkeley.edu

The conference aims at merging two dynamics: on the one hand the "judicialisation"of related religious disputes in secular contexts,and on the other one the "de-judicialisation" of a relgion based set of norms often designated under the label of sharia.


 

By focusing on Muslims and Islam as core objet of study the goal is not to consider it as exceptional. On the contrary, the conference wishes to widen the scope to the place of religion in the public sphere.

The conference will take place on May 7th and 8th, 2009 on "Islamic norms in secular public spheres: political problems, legal issues, and social practices" with the support of Olivier Roy (right) who teaches at UC Berkeley in 2008-2009 and Valérie Amiraux (left) from the University of Montreal. 

Click here for the program
Co-sponsors: The Robert Schuman Centre, The Carnegie Corporation, The Graduate Theological UnionThe Institute of Slavic, Eastern European and Eurasian Studies, Chaire de recherche du Canada en etude du pluralisme religieux et de l'ethnicite (CRSH/Universite de Montreal)

April 24, 2009 - April 25, 2009

The UC Berkeley Positive Political Theory group hosts a two-day workshop onEndogenous Institutions and Political Conflict every spring on the Berkeley campus. This workshop brings together a group of scholars who share related interests on institutions. Papers are presented on a wide variety of topics, including civil wars, authority, war and collective action, polarization, inefficient states and democracy. Click here for the program.

December 11, 2008 - December 12, 2008

 

California-EU Regulatory Cooperation
Project

Berkeley Biosafety and Biodiversity Workshop

December 11-12, 2008
Berkeley, California 
Helzel Board Room
Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley

As socioeconomic and environmental issues become increasingly integrated, innovative policy solutions are required to identify and address the complex nexus between society and environment. Serving as models for other political jurisdictions, California and the European Union have helped define the forefront of environmental policy solutions. The aim of this workshop is to bring together representatives from the US and the EU in academia, industry, the NGO-sector, and government in order to examine regulatory approaches to addressing biodiversity and biosafety issues in light of climate change. 

The workshop will take place at Haas School of Business on the UC Berkeley Campus from December 11-12. A list of invited participants and discussion topics is here

For a list of working papers for the project click here

Managing Biosafety and Biodiversity in a Global World - EU, US, California and Comparative Perspectives: http://www.biosafetyandbiodiversity.eu

The project is funded by the European Commission (DG External Relations) within the framework of the pilot-program on Transatlantic Methods for Handling Global Challenges. 

Sponsored by the IGS Center on Institutions and Governance ( http://igov.berkeley.edu), Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven. 

The project is funded by the European Commission (DG External Relations) within the framework of the pilot-program on Transatlantic Methods for Handling Global Challenges

June 27, 2008 - July 1, 2008

The first China Economics Summer Institute took place in 2008. The objective of the China Summer Economics Institute is to create a network and community of top level scholars working on Chinese economic development. This initiative is co-sponsored by UC Berkeley, the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, the LICOS-Center for Institutions and Economic Performance at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Hong Kong University and the School of Economics and Management at Tsinghua University. The Summer Institute was organized in collaboration with the BREAD, NBER and CEPR networks of academic economists.

Click here for the papers that were presented

The past program is available here.

June 11, 2008

Professor David Vogel, UC Berkeley
CEPS Conference Room
Brussels, Belgium

David Vogel will report on the California-EU Regulatory Project Workshop held at UC Berkeley on Feb. 22-23, 2008. The workshop is part of the California-EU Regulatory Cooperation Project, which compares environmental polices in California and Europe, examines how each political jurisdiction has affected the other's regulatory policies and priorities, and explores opportunities for future regulatory cooperation. 

 David Vogel is a professor in the Haas School of Business and the Department of Political Science at UC Berkeley. He has written extensively on European and American regulatory policies. His presentation will be followed by a panel discussion.
  
Chair: Professor Johan F.M. Swinnen, CEPS Senior Research Fellow
  
Discussants
Robert H. Donkers, Delegation of the European Commission in India
Ian Clark, Head of the Research, Science and Innovation unit in the European Commission's Directorate General for Environment

In cooperation with The German Marshall Fund of the United States and the Centre for Global Governance at the University of Leuven.


May 9, 2008 - May 10, 2008

 

The UC Berkeley Positive Political Theory group will host a two-day workshop on Endogenous Institutions and Political Conflict on the Berkeley campus. This workshop brought together a group of scholars who share related interests on institutions. Papers were presented on a wide variety of topics, including civil wars, authority, war and collective action, polarization, inefficient states and democracy. Papers will be posted as they come in and can be found here.
February 22, 2008 - February 23, 2008

 

The Center on Institutions and Governance is organizing an innovative scholarly task force that explores the relationship between the regulatory policies of California and the European Union. Both the EU at the global level and California at the national level have emerged as regulatory policy leaders. This project promotes additional opportunities for regulatory cooperation, learning, and emulation between California and the EU. It also provides opportunities for interaction among academics, activists, business managers and policy-makers on both sides of the Atlantic.

The California-EU Regulatory Cooperation Project has been made possible thanks to a German Marshall Fund grant.

For more information on the project, see this overview.

A seminar focused on this project has been organized at the UC Berkeley Faculty Club's Seaborg Room on February 22-23, 2008. For a list of participants and abstracts of the papers that have been presented, click here

February 13, 2008

Ambassador John Bruton

Head of Delegation of the European Commission in the United States

Ambassador Bruton spoke about how a bi-directional partnership between the EU and California is evolving and what chances there are for future regulatory cooperation, learning, and emulation between them. California has been a regulatory trendsetter at the national and international levels. Recently the European Union has become a global regulatory leader, while California has become both a launching pad for American versions of European regulation and an innovator that influences Europe.

November 28, 2007 - January 25, 2008

 

What's the Beef? The Contested Governance of European Food Safety (Politics, Science and Environment)"

By Chris Ansell (Right), Associate Professor of Political Science , UC Berkeley and
David Vogel (Left), Professor of Political Science, UC Berkeley
January 25, 2008, 4:30 p.m.
Harris Seminar Room,
119 Moses Hall 

A series of food-related crises -- most notably mad cow disease in Britain, farmer protests in France against American hormone-treated beef, and the European Union's banning of genetically modified food -- has turned the regulation of food safety in Europe into a crucible for issues of institutional trust, legitimacy, and effectiveness. What's the Beef?examines European food safety regulation at the national, European, and international levels as a case of "contested governance" -- a syndrome of policymaking and political dispute in which not only policy outcomes but also the fundamental legitimacy of existing institutional arrangements are challenged.

"Exposed: The Toxic Chemistry of Everyday Products and What's at Stake for American Power"

By Mark Schapiro, Editorial Director, Center for Investigative Journalism 
November 28, 2007, 4 p.m. 
Harris Seminar Room, 119 Moses Hall

Mark Schapiro's book investigates how corporations intent on thwarting stricter environmental and health guidelines here in the U.S. are forced to meet new demands by the European Union to improve their products. The resulting global economic power shift places Brussels, not Washington, in the driver's seat.

October 26, 2007

See the Webcast of this Oct. 26 panel discussion, in which panelists made bold predictions about the upcoming election and talked about the importance of framing and the Netroots movement. Questions from the audience were addressed by panelists in the second half.

Co-sponsored by the Center on Institutions and Governance, the Center on Politics(http://politics.berkeley.edu) and The Rockridge Institute (http://www.rockridgeinstitute.org/)

 

George Lakoff

Joan
Blades

Markos Moulitsas
Paul
Pierson

Professor
UC Berkeley Founder of 
Rockridge Institute

Co-founder Moveon.org
Daily Kos
Professor
UC Berkeley
September 7, 2007 - September 8, 2007

 

Questions of ethnoracial division (linked to slavery, colonial rule, and/or immigration), citizenship, and politics loom large today not only in the United States but also in many other advanced nations. 

None is perhaps more urgently concerned with these issues today than France. And none provides a more fruitful comparative case with the United States, since the two republics share a germane commitment to the democratic ideal and a common claim to embody civic universality.

To download the program, click here. To download abstracts of the papers, click here. To download the biographies of the participants, click here.

Sponsored by the Institute of Governmental Studies, the UC Humanities Research Institute, theUCB Diversity Initiative, theConsulate of France in San Francisco, the UCB French Dept, the UCB Religion, Politics and Globalization Program, the UCB Institute for the Study of Social Change, theUCB Dept of Historyand the UCB Dept of Sociology.

June 27, 2007

Ambassador John Bruton
World Affairs Council

Ambassador John Bruton, Head of Delegation of the European Commission in the United States, spoke at the World Affairs Council Auditorium, 312 Sutter Street in San Francisco. Bruton spoke about the current state of the partnership between the United States, Canada and the European Union, a relationship based on shared common values and close cultural, economic, social and political ties. For more information download the event flyer [temporarily unavailable] (in PDF format).

Co-sponsored by the French American Chamber of Commerce in San Francisco and the Center on Institutions & Governance at UC Berkeley.

May 16, 2007

 

2007 was the 300th year anniversary of the birth of Carl Linnaeus, the Swedish scientist known as the founder of taxonomy. Linnaeus was not only a noted biologist but an ecologist and environmentalist who was ahead of his time.

A symposium honoring Linnaeus featured a concert by the Collegium Cantorum Choir of the Cathedral of Uppsala, a screening of the documentary film Expedition Linnaeus commemorating the tercentenary of the birth of Carl Linnaeus and three panel discussions on the extinction of plant and animal species; development of alternative energy sources and green technology initiatives; and the political economy of transatlantic regulatory cooperation.

Thanks to all of our sponsors: UC Berkeley's Center on Institutions and Governance, The College of Natural Resources, Barbro Osher, Honorary Consul General of Sweden, SM Interhuman Communications, The Scandinavian Department, The Church of Sweden, Collegium Cantorum and The EPA of Sweden.

April 27, 2007 - April 28, 2007

The UC Berkeley Positive Political Theory group hosted a two-day workshop on Endogenous Institutions and Political Conflict on the Berkeley campus. This workshop brings together a group of scholars who share related interests on institutions. Papers were presented on a wide variety of topics, including civil wars, authority, war and collective action, polarization, inefficient states and democracy. For the workshop schedule, please click here. Papers to be discussed are posted here.

January 25, 2007

 

Olivier Roy, research director at the French National Center for Scientific Research, spoke on "Western Muslims or Muslims in the West?" at UC Berkeley on January 25, 2007. Click here for a summary of Dr. Roy's talk.

 

 

May 18, 2006

For several weeks in late 2005 France experienced nightly riots. Originally touched off after the accidental electrocution of two young men of North african descent fleeing police, the riots tapped into a deep resentment around racism and lack of opportunity for immigrants and their children within French society. French government's proposed changes in labor law introduced in March of this year, partially an attempt to alleviate high youth unemployment which are perceived to underlie the riots, again provoked massive unrest this time in the form of protest organized by opposition parties, student organizations and labor unions. The event was sponsored by the World Affairs Council and was held at the offices of the World Affairs Council (312 Sutter Street, Suite 200; San Francisco 94108). For the conference program, please click here.

May 12, 2006

 

The goal of the workshop was to examine the impact of EU regulations on US firms and on US legislation. An emerging literature emphasizes the role of the European Union as a regulatory power. The fiscal powers of the European Union are rather small and are not expected to increase. They are probably more likely to decrease as can be seen from the 2005 budget crisis.

However, researchers are realizing more and more that the regulatory powers of the European Union are quite strong and have an influence not only on Member States but also outside Europe. These regulatory powers have grown very much due to the intense legislative activity of the last 15 years at the level of the European Union. This legislative activity has developed with the Single Market Program aiming at harmonizing a great deal of EU legislation in order to remove non tariff barriers within the European Union. This has given de facto important regulatory powers to the EU which influence not only markets inside Europe but also outside Europe . This became clear with the indictment of Microsoft by the European Commission following an unsuccessful anti-trust case against the software company in the US. The workshop also discussed the EU's regulatory powers under current discussion with the REACH regulation which aims at regulating chemical products, and the possibility of adapting the REACH regulation to California, which has generated interest among federal and state legislators in the US. The conference that was held on the UC Berkeley campus in the Harris Room (119 Moses Hall) from 9:30 a.m. until 2 p.m., was sponsored by CIG and the Institute of European Studies (Title VI Grant). For the conference program, please click here.

May 5, 2006 - May 6, 2006

An interdisciplinary conference

Organized by

Loïc WACQUANT (UC-Berkeley) & Bruce WESTERN (Princeton)

Friday May 5 and Saturday May 6, 2006

Universityof California, Berkeley

Center for the Study of Law and Society (2240 Piedmont Avenue), on May 5, and the Blumer Room, 402 Barrows, on May 6

This conference is co-sponsored by the Russell Sage Foundation, the Center on Institutions and Governance at IGS, the UC Berkeley Department of Sociology, the Princeton University Department of Sociology, the Center for the Study of Law & Society, the Jurisprudence and Social Policy Program, and the Boalt Hall School of Law

Featuring 10 faculty and 16 doctoral students from UC Berkeley, Princeton, New York University, Chicago, Minnesota, San Jose and San Diego, this conference aims to give a new generation of scholars working on crime/law/punishment across the disciplines an opportunity to gather collective steam and put the penal state squarely on the intellectual map by creating firmer linkages between research on deviance, policing, the courts, corrections and their extensions, on the one hand, and broader social institutions, economic structures, political trends, and cultural constellations, on the other. The conference is an opportunity for scholars across the gamut of disciplines -- sociology, history, the law, political science, justice studies, anthropology, and public policy -- to share problems and perspectives and engage in a vigorous dialogue liable to help them better disentangle the nexus tying penal policies and practices to new forms of inequality and identity emerging in the United States at century’s dawn.

For further details and updates, as well as abstracts of the papers presented, see the full program at http://igov.berkeley.edu/conferences/

This interdisciplinary conference focused on the politics of the prison boom and its causal relationship with and contribution to resurging inequality. It also stimulated the participation of scholars who have not previously focused on the police, the courts, and corrections, in an effort to bring penal institutions "back" into core areas of sociology, including research on stratification and the labor market, race and ethnicity, public opinion and public policy, social welfare, and urban sociology. The conference provided advanced doctoral students and new assistant professors with a platform not only to present their own work but also exposed participants to research on the various interacting aspects of the criminal justice system being carried out in sociology, anthropology, political science, history, law, the humanities, and public policy. The conference was sponsored by the CIG, the Department of Sociology, the Jurisprudence and Social Policy Program, and the Princeton University Department of Sociology. The event was held on Friday, May 5, at the Center for the Study of Law and Society (2240 Piedmont Avenue), and on Saturday, May 6, in the Blumer Room (402 Barrows Hall). For the conference program, please click here. For abstracts and papers that were presented at the conference, please click here.

April 21, 2006 - April 22, 2006

The UC Berkeley Positive Political Theory group organized a workshop on Endogenous Institutions and Political Conflict that will take place on the Berkeley campus. The goal of the workshop was to bring together a group of scholars who share related interests on institutions. The workshop took a broad view of institutions, such as peace settlements, political transitions, and power sharing arrangements. The unifying theme of the workshop was that institutions or key aspects of them are often an outcome of some underlying process. During the day and a half meeting, participants presented six papers and shared ideas about the general theme of institutional development in the shadow of war and the threat of violence. The workshop was held in the Harris Room (119 Moses Hall) at the Institute of Governmental Studies. For the workshop schedule, please click here. For workshop papers, please click here.

April 14, 2006 - April 15, 2006

The aim of the conference was to bring together scholars who study various aspects of legislative behavior. The conference offered scholars the opportunity to present, compare and discuss their latest legislative behavior theory, methodology or empirical research based on datasets of roll call votes from legislative bodies throughout the world. The main goals of the conference included, but were not limited to: advancing the analysis of legislative behavior by examining new legislative roll call databases in a comparative perspective; encouraging the advancement of statistical and econometric estimation techniques relying on roll call votes using both longitudinal and cross country data; and spurring the development of theories of voting behavior and coalition formation. The workshop gathered experts on legislative behavior from a variety of methodological perspectives and covered a diversity of geographical regions. The conference was sponsored by CIG and the UC San Diego Department of Political Science. The conference was held at the Del Mar Inn, north of the UC San Diego campus. For a conference schedule, please click here. For conference papers, please click here.

May 27, 2005 - May 28, 2005

Bringing together academics, policy experts, and funding organizations from the US and EU, this conference focused on the changing political and economic environment for agriculture in the two regions. Specific issues that were discussed include the changing nature of agri-environmental programs and the policy making process, the role and interaction of different stakeholders in deciding agri-environmental policies, and the function of international bodies such as the WTO in determining US-EU agricultural bargaining. The conference was sponsored by CIG, the Agricultural and Resource Economics Department, the Giannini Foundation, and the Institute of European Studies. For a detailed description of the conference, please click here. The conference was held in Grass Valley, California. For pictures of the conference, please click here. For presentations from the conference, please click here.

April 27, 2005

 

With the referendum on the EU Constitution taking place in different countries within the European Union, this panel examined the arguments in favor and against the EU Constitution. The conference was sponsored by CIG, the World Affairs Council, and the School of Journalism. For a detailed description of the conference, click here. The conference was held in the IGS Library (109 Moses) from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m..

April 22, 2005

 Until now, most academic studies focusing on Islam fall into one of two categories: Area Studies (Middle East, Central Asia etc.) or "Islamology," that is, the study of Islamic religion and history. The resulting patchwork of microcosmic field studies on the one hand, and a purely culturalist and holistic approach of Islam on the other, does not take into account the effect of globalization on Islam. Contemporary radical Islam, for example, is transnational and increasingly rooted in the West itself; it is less a legacy of traditional Islam than a product of globalization. As we have seen with particular urgency since 9/11, when the academic community fails to deal with Islam on these terms, the field is relegated to journalists or security experts. The goal of the conference was to go beyond the boundaries of existing academic fields to understand the new phenomenon of transnational Islam and to address the following issues: the globalization of Islam; the relationship between Islam as a universal religion and the specific cultures of the Middle East; the feasibility of democratization of Muslim countries; and the relationship between Islam and democracy. The conference was sponsored by CIG and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies. The Center for Southeast Asia StudiesFrench DepartmentGraduate Theological UnionInstitute of European Studies,Townsend Center, and International and Area Studies also supported the conference. For a detailed description of the conference, click here. The conference was held in the Lipman Room (8th Floor, Barrows Hall) from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.. For working papers from the conference, please click hereA webcast of the conference is now available here.

March 12, 2005

This one-day seminar on the political situation in Nepal brought together academics, journalists and political activists. They reflected different backgrounds and viewed the insurgency in conflicting terms. This was a controversial exchange which shed new light on the conflict and its origins, and on possible avenues to its solution. The conference was sponsored by CIG, the Department of Political Science, the Human Rights Center, and the Center for South Asia Studies. For a detailed description of the conference, click here.

February 5, 2005

This conference will gather experts on legislative behavior from various angles and will cover different geographical regions. Special attention will be given to legislative behavior in the European Union in light of the newly drafted Constitution for the European Union. One of the main goals of the conference is to use the comparative perspective to to analyze legislative behavior in the European Parliament and the European Council and to compare fruitfully legislative behavior in the European Union with the experience of the US and other democracies. Methodological and econometric issues in the analysis of legislative behavior will also be discussed. The conference is sponsored by CIG and the Institute of European Studies. For a detailed description of the conference, click here. For working papers from the conference, please click here.